Skip to Content

Michael Dubose

Medicaid Expansion and The Local Criminal Justice System

Topic
In this article, published in American Jails magazine, COCHS' CEO, Michael Dubose, explains the implications of Medicaid expansion for jail-involved populations.

Author
Michael DuBose, COCHS

NACo Sponsored Working Group on Jail Assembly Line: Feb 24, 2012

Recording of Working Group

Featured Speaker
Dr. Keith Barton, Medical Director of COCHS

Transcript of Dr. Barton's Presentation
Health Intake, Assessment, and Routine Care Processes in County Jails

Flow Charts
Intake Process
Sick Call
Discharge Planning

Authors
Dr. Keith Barton, Medical Director of COCHS
Michael Dubose, CEO of COCHS
Edward Harrison, CCHP, President of National Commission on Correctional Health Care

Health Intake, Assessment, and Routine Care Processes in County Jails

Topic
This paper explains the difference between jails and prisons and then proceeds to describe various health care procedures that occur within a jail setting. The flow charts below detail a step-by-step description of these procedures.

Flow Charts
Intake Process
Sick Call
Discharge Planning

Authors
Dr. Keith Barton, Medical Director of COCHS
Michael Dubose, CEO of COCHS
Edward Harrison, CCHP, President of the National Commission on Correctional Health Care

Michael DuBose and Steven Rosenberg:
Closing Remarks

Michael DuBose and Steven Rosenberg talk about the impact of the ACA on justice involved populations. They specify three going forward questions that will need to be answered concerning the health care coverage for this population:

  • Who will serve them?
  • What will be available?
  • What will it cost?

The fact that these questions can even be asked implies that the initial steps have been taken to integrate the health care needs of justice involved populations with the mainstream health care system.

New York Times: Prosecutors and Safety
In a letter to the editor of The New York Times, Keith Barton (COCHS) and David LaBahn (Assn. of Prosecuting Attorneys) respond to a Sept. 29 column by David Brooks headlined The Prison Problem which suggested that district attorneys are overly aggressive in their prosecutions and, further, that prosecutors have misaligned incentives because they “tend not to have to worry about the financial costs of what they do.” Barton and LaBahn write “this portrait ignores the connections that prosecutors across the country have formed with community groups to address public safety.” The letter continues: Collaborations between prosecutors and community groups are yielding important results. Together, we can divert people away from jails, improve access to health care and address the root causes that lead to criminal behavior. Read more...